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5 Grooming Mistakes Dog Owners Make

 People are apprehensive about grooming their dogs for fear of making a mistake. Mistakes happen, and your dog will forgive you, but we’re here to give you some tips on how to avoid grappling while grooming.

 

1.     Prep to Avoid the Stress

Take a cue from the boy scouts — be prepared. Prior to bath time, get organized to reduce stress for you and your dog, for example:

  • Take him for a brisk walk to release…

Featured Tips

Cool Tip for Winter Walks 

Winter is the time to be especially mindful of your pup’s paws as they are susceptible to cracks, irritation or infections from the snow, salt, gravel and ice. To minimize these problems, keep cleaning wipes by the door and wipe off your dog’s feet after each walk. 

Keep Your Dog Dry when Outside 

Autumn brings piles of leaves for your dog to jump in. Unfortunately, with all this frolicking your pooch is bound to find something unfavorable to roll around in. So if your dog needs a bath, make sure he is completely dry before going outside again. Fall temperatures can be cool and it’s easy for dogs, especially small or short hair breeds, to become chilled or develop hypothermia.

Hot Tip for Summer Grooming 

Fleas and ticks can be particularly vigilant during the dog days of summer. Thankfully you can help keep these critters at bay the all-natural way by clipping, trimming, brushing, and bathing regularly.

TAKE A SHINE TO A NEW DIET 

The key to a shiny coat may be a change in diet. For example, adding vegetable or fish oil to your dog’s food can do the trick; just be sure to consult your vet first.

AVOID FROZEN PAWS ON WINTER WALKS 

In the winter it’s important to keep the fur that grows in between the pads of your dog’s feet trimmed because it can collect clumps of snow that turn to ice making it painful for your dog to walk.

Brushing Your Dog Each Day Keeps the Bugs at Bay  

After taking your dog for a walk or playing outside, brush them thoroughly before re-entering your house. A pin/bristle brush will remove loose debris – and creepy crawlies.  Since fleas and ticks can be present anytime the temperature is above freezing, consider making this practice part of your regular grooming routine.

Keep your Dog Bright Eyed and Bushy Tailed 

Keeping the fur around your dog’s eyes trimmed will keep hair from scraping on his eye and help prevent bacteria from causing an infection.

Brush up on Teeth Brushing 

Regular teeth cleaning can stave off bad breath, extra trips to the vet and even a life-threatening bacterial infection. The trick is to get your dog used to the idea of brushing by first gently massaging his gums with your finger.

RELAXING YOUR DOG THE NATURAL WAY  

Some professional dog groomers insist that aromatherapy works for calming down dogs  that may be apprehensive about being groomed. There aren’t studies to back it up but many claim the aromas of peppermint and spearmint will calm a dog, reduce stress and promote relaxation. A vanilla-lavender combination may also work.

IT'S TIME TO RE-THINK THE WAY TO DE-STINK  

Bathing a dog in tomato juice often works if he has been sprayed by a skunk but you can try a home recipe that’s not as messy: 1 quart of 3% hydrogen peroxide, ¼ cup of baking soda, 1 teaspoon of liquid soap.

WANT TO ELIMINATE RUG ODORS? JOIN THE CLUB SODA CLUB  

If your dog leaves a puddle on the carpet, a good way to eliminate urine odor is to pour club soda on the blotted-up area. Allow it to sit for several minutes before toweling up. You can also use a odor neutralizer to minimize unpleasant smells on pet beds, furniture, and carpet. (Test for color fastness first)

CLEAN UP PESKY FUR...WITH NO STATIC CLING!  

Removing stubborn fur from a car’s upholstery can be a seemingly-impossible task. Next time, try rubbing an unused dryer sheet across the area. It usually attracts the fur or loosens it enough for subsequent vacuuming.

YOU WILL DIG THESE WAYS TO DETER DOGGIE DIGGING  

Are you tired of dogs digging in your garden? These plant species usually deter dogs, according to the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center: a). calendula; b). sweetgum tree; c). rue; d). shrubbery hedges; and e). prickly plants.

TOO-FREQUENT BATHING CAN BE BAD FOR YOUR DOG  

Always stick to recommended guidelines for bathing your dog and avoid giving baths too frequently. It can dry out his skin, disperse necessary oils and lead to itching, rashes and possibly even infections. The general rule of thumb is one bath every three months but some breeds need to be bathed with greater frequency. In between baths, you can also try using an odor neutralizer or doggie deodorant to curb any unpleasant smells. 

HOME REMEDIES WORK BEST ON STICKY SITUATIONS  

If your dog gets something gooey on his paws, it can be softened for removal with margarine, peanut butter or shortening. If he gets chewing gum in his fur, apply ice to the gum to make it brittle enough for removal. You can also try a mixture of warm salt water and olive oil.

CLICKETY-CLACK, CLICKETY CLACK IT'S TIME TO CUT THOSE NAILS BACK  

When you hear the click-clacking of nails on floors or hard surfaces, it’s time to trim your dog’s nails. Long nails can break or become ingrown, leading to a litany of infections and complications.

GROOMING REALLY GROWS ON YOUR NEW PUPPY  

It’s always wise to start grooming and nail clipping when your dog is a puppy. It will get him accustomed to the process and make it easier on everyone in ensuing years. Introducing grown dogs to home grooming is usually a greater challenge.

 

TIRED OF A RESTLESS DOG? EXERCISE BEFORE GROOMING  

If your dog gets restless or antsy and won’t stand still during grooming activities, it might be wise to take him for a walk or exercise before brushing, bathing, trimming or nail clipping. It will lessen any excess energy and make it easier to accomplish the task

 

IT'S OK TO BABY YOUR DOG... BUT NOT WITH BABY SHAMPOO  

It might be convenient and tempting but you should never use human soap, shampoo or toothpaste when grooming a pet. Soap and shampoo not formulated for a dog can irritate his skin and result in rashes and the elimination of necessary oils. The ingredients and additives in human toothpaste are likely to irritate a dog’s stomach as well.